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  #10  
Old 15-09-2017
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Paul-JK  Paul-JK is offline
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From memory the timing belt did need changing. I had mine done at a 90,000km as I was getting some strange noises (which I think was one of the pulleys). The timing belt itself is not massively expensive but the general rule of thumb is to do the serpentine belt, pulleys & water pumps while you're in there. That adds to cost but saves you having to pull it all apart later if one of the other parts fails.

Owning a JK you will certainly learn to research what you buy and not just rely on dealers or the usual local parts guys that probably service your Toyota well. Parts here are generally very expensive. Most stuff is available from the US at a fraction of the price, even including freight, though you do need to be careful of the whole left-hand-drive/right-hand-drive thing depending on what you're buying, and also note that Australian ADR's a lot more strict than the US equivalent so not everything that is sold in the US is legal here. The 2.8 CRD isn't available in the US but parts can be bought relatively cheap (certainly cheaper than here) from the UK.

One other thing to be aware of (well two actually) is that compared to a Landcruiser the JK has very very limited space for carrying stuff, even the 4dr. Small rear overhang means a short boot. It has a deceptively narrow body as well and the roll cage takes up a lot of what space it does have. I had Nissan X-Trail before my JK and it had WAY more load space than the JK. Packing a JK is an art form. Coupled with that the JK also has a fairly lousy payload. Add a front bar, some decent rock rails/side steps (very advisable on the 4dr), a roof rack for the bulky light stuff and then pack it up for a trip and you'll be at GVM easily. Add long range tanks, roof top tent, bigger axles, 37's and a rear bar (as you'll need it carry the 37" spare) and I seriously doubt you could keep it legal in terms of GVM even before loading it for a trip. With that sort a build I think you'd need to look at a trailer to carry the camping stuff for long trips to keep it legal.......and the trailer also helps out with the packing space issue as well. Horses for courses at the end off the day. The JK is a great 4WD and great fun to drive, but it wasn't designed to haul loads. I toured in mine with a camper trailer and it was great but mine was only a modest build (33's, 2" lift, front bar & side steps).
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  #11  
Old 15-09-2017
photojeep  photojeep is offline
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Even the Toyota recommend the timing belt changed after km and time. We swapped ours out well before 100k before a long outback trip as a guarantee. Sure, it isn't a cheap belt to buy and replace and it is well made, but compared to a belt failure and the damage to the engine it's better to swap it out.

Agree regarding the limited space on the JK for a camping trip. Hoping the JT Scrambler will be a better outback trip option...
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Old 15-09-2017
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G.man View Post
Does the timing belt really have to get changed?

I'm just asking because we had our timing belt (300,000 km over due) replaced on our toyota and when it came out it still had markings on it as if it was new and did not need replacing. Was a $1200 (friend rate vs the 2000 quoted) expense for absolutely nothing.

That car could have gone 500,000 without changing the timing belt.

.
The consequence of timing belt failure whilst driving on most makes engine designs is nearly catastrophic for your wallet and not so good for the engine.
Most makes build interference engines and when the rubber band breaks the metal nearly always meets the metal.

Toyota on the other hand for many years built all their engines as non-interference design and a on road timing belt failure was only an inconvenience of a tow and paying for the belts subsequent replacement.
But more recently toyota engine designs are becoming increasingly interference design and why would you want to risk failure with the result being a tow, a major top end rebuild with the car likely sidelined for weeks maybe months?

I have occasionally over the years seen some cars come in with the timing belts overdue by 30,000kms and even saw one with 70,000kms overdue and the belts still looked healthy when removed but I have also seen some belts fail early because the owner decided it wasn't ready for replacement because the car had not reached the required KM's and forgot most belts are lifetime limited as well because rubber perishes with heat and exposure to oxygen.
And on recent vehicle at a colleagues workshop the repair bill for a failed timing belt ran to in excess of $8000 because the head could not be repaired and needed to be replaced as well as one holed piston.
  #13  
Old 15-09-2017
mick666  mick666 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Classic Boy View Post
The consequence of timing belt failure whilst driving on most makes engine designs is nearly catastrophic for your wallet and not so good for the engine.
Most makes build interference engines and when the rubber band breaks the metal nearly always meets the metal.

Toyota on the other hand for many years built all their engines as non-interference design and a on road timing belt failure was only an inconvenience of a tow and paying for the belts subsequent replacement.
But more recently toyota engine designs are becoming increasingly interference design and why would you want to risk failure with the result being a tow, a major top end rebuild with the car likely sidelined for weeks maybe months?

I have occasionally over the years seen some cars come in with the timing belts overdue by 30,000kms and even saw one with 70,000kms overdue and the belts still looked healthy when removed but I have also seen some belts fail early because the owner decided it wasn't ready for replacement because the car had not reached the required KM's and forgot most belts are lifetime limited as well because rubber perishes with heat and exposure to oxygen.
And on recent vehicle at a colleagues workshop the repair bill for a failed timing belt ran to in excess of $8000 because the head could not be repaired and needed to be replaced as well as one holed piston.
I dont think my timing belt is made of rubber.
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  #14  
Old 15-09-2017
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Sounds like you should go buy an 80 series 4.2 1HD-FTE

CRD's will not tolerate the type of neglect some seem to consider normal or acceptable.


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  #15  
Old 16-09-2017
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mick666 View Post
I dont think my timing belt is made of rubber.
They call them timing chains.
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  #16  
Old 16-09-2017
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For those interested, I have decided to go a hybrid approach. AEV 3.5 lift kit, e locker in the rear and 295 nittos. This allows my car to remain 100% legal and get benefits from both.
  #17  
Old 16-09-2017
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Ok....

Price aside as it seems they end up costing the same one way or another, either in servicing or in petrol.

So...someone mentioned the US. I know of JK Expeditions in the US, they do the MOAB etc all with petrol wranglers as diesel is not available showing the petrol is a great performer. Then you get the few that stick a 500+ HP 6.1 Hemi v8 which = performance but of course at a huge fuel expense.

So my question is, if Diesel was available in the US, would the MOAB etc that JK Expeditions do, be 'easier' ?

What I am trying to gauge, as a purely off road vehicle, what is more capable, mud, rock crawling etc, diesel or petrol? Which is the better performer?
  #18  
Old 02-10-2017
fdn522  fdn522 is offline
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I've got a 2013 crd manual, in low range it automatically idles up which helps casually getting up rocks and ledges. I've had 315/70s on it and didn't notice much power loss/ if any. It does get a bit warm when towing the camper though which I'm not happy about, even when on 285s.
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