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  #9  
Old 16-11-2017
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Thanks mate.

Many thanks for the support.

Another little update from yesterdays work.


Hockey sticks! Like the rear wall, had to attach parts of the curved sections of the inner window frame left from not cutting the rear wall through the vertical section.


Joins in the middle of a curve are always harder to dress later than if done in the middle of the vertical part.


Cut our where the old seat belt mount was so I could get to the rest of the joins around the B pillar. The outer panel covers the rear face, and it is too hard to weld around the corner of the other seam. I also used a flat blade screw driver and hammered out the edge of the hole left that had caved in from the seat belt bolt passing through from the outside.


Once flat again I could tack in a patch to be fully welded in. Still able to hammer out any distortion through the B pillar from the other side.


Hole now gone.


I was now able to align the pillar and weld across the back of it and side. Also added weld to both sides to better join the lip left from the face of the pillar as the seat belt mount plate will attach there.


Regulations call for a minimum of a 50x75x3mm, ( 2"x3"x1/8") plate for the seat belt mounting bolts. I have gone taller and slightly thicker in this case. A 7/16" UNF nut is mounted behind the plate, the same used on all belt mounting points.


Sometimes you have to be a bit creative to align things before tacking!


So both upper seat belt mounts done and the inner window frame extended and welded into place.
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  #10  
Old 18-11-2017
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Sorry but not a lot to show for the last few days as just a lot of shape correcting that should have been done even before tacking, let alone fully welded! Taking longer this way and the job doesn't finish to the same standard in the end unless I spend an extra few days metal finishing it. Owner dropped around last night and is very pleased with leaving it with corrected shape that will only need a smear of filler or heavy build primer before paint.


Before any grinding is done on these welds, I look for any obvious low spots like this.


A rounded chisel is hammered on to knock the low spot level.


I showed earlier the unsound joint here on both sides. Ended up removing the tack channel from the fill in piece that was too short, and then welding up the rest of the joint. Then fitting a longer tack channel back in its place to meet up with the one that goes down the A pillar.


The welds along the side peaked outwards as it had not been probably shaped beforehand. I held this spoon behind the seam and hammer the weld outside until it just touched the spoon. You can feel and hear it when this happens. I didn't want to stretch this weld at all due to the outwards peak it had.


After grinding, some low spots were hammered out from behind using this that I had made for the corners. Just concentrating on getting a good shape without spending a lot of time getting a metal finish on this project.


Corner joint looked like a baseball cap where it meets the visor part where the two sections met after the 1.5" strip was cutout. Was able to re-shape it to flow better though.


The left on these two joints had about a 3mm-1/8" gap that needed to be welded up. It pulled a bit more on that side but both seams need to hammer on dolly to stretch the weld and raise it up.


Flows much better now and no dips in it.


View from the rear.


Dressed up the front weld and got some shape correction back into it. The centre fill in piece is pulled way down.


Starting to sit up a bit more now but will go on first welding the other half before going any further.


Front section has all been welded now. This half went a lot quicker as I was able to correct the shape before welding, but had to cut some of their tacks and redo them to get the shape right. This was because the metal was forced to meet up and then tacked under pressure by the panel shop. So much harder to correct the shape when done this way and I could see the strain on the metal. They were forming little 'puckers'.


Big gaps like this I hold a copper spoon behind it as I weld it up. The weld wont stick to the copper and helps stop the gas blowing through the gap and causing porosity.


Just watch out though as the copper gets damn hot and will burn you if you accidentally lean on it! Got me right between the gloves and the overalls.


Hard to tell where the big gaps were.


Cleaned up alright too.
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  #11  
Old 19-11-2017
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Got some more shaping done now the the welding is all finished up. Front is not sitting too badly considering the gaping hole gives no support at all right now!


Finished the rear as well and took out some of the high crown it had to better suit an insert later.
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  #12  
Old 19-11-2017
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looking good Gojeep, much better, than when you started, but are you taking the rat out!?
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  #13  
Old 19-11-2017
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This is amazing work!

I've been cutting a little bit of rust out of the old fsj and I wish I had the same skills for getting it back together.

What are you using to weld?
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  #14  
Old 21-11-2017
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Losing a bit more 'Rat' every day.

Everything so far has been welded with a mig using 0.6 wire which is much better to use than 0.8 or 0.9 due to the lower melting point. Using mig more due to the poor gapping and the speed of getting the job done.


After doing all the adjusting I could on the hinges and forcing the top of the frame over, it was still hanging outwards at the top if the rest of the door was in line.


The front was the same although not as bad.


A wedge was cut into the frame where the bend was needed.


Pushed over and tacked. Then checked to see if it was enough. Remember it will pull a few millimetres more with the weld shrinkage, so allow for that to save stretching the weld afterwards


Welded up.


Looks a lot better now.


Front was also done.


Now this difference in width of the window frame needs to be dealt with. The frame had a slight taper to it so it shows up once the 5.5" was chopped out.


Can see it better from this angle.


Bottom was cut and then pulled in only to the point where it lined up with the top of the frame. Pulling it to meet the bottom of the upper half would leave a dip which will show up once the straight window surround is against it.


Top half cut and pulled out to meet the lower piece.


All finished up.


Now in my opinion the height difference between the windscreen and the door window is out of proportion to each other. It is why I sectioned the cab under the windscreen and chopped only the door window 2" to match it up. Unfortunately this only gets worse the bigger the chop if both windscreen and window is cut only such as here.


Same from the back view.


Now I had this idea to solve the problem another way many years ago before I sectioned mine the way I did. That is to raise the window sill instead. This mock up it is raised 50mm or 2" to match the height of the windscreen not including the flanges.


Rear view with 50mm-2" raised window sill.


This is 65mm-2.5" which matches the opening of the windscreen including the flanges.


65mm-2.5" raised window sill. The inside frame would have to be raised as well to match of course and would not have the extra ribs. Just a thought anyway.
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  #15  
Old 22-11-2017
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Like on the other door, I also fixed the inner frame alignment more than had been done.


I had to cut through their tack and sharpened up the inside fold. The glass channel sits in this corner.


Needs a little more sharpening of the fold further down, but a lot better than it was before. Also had to do the same pulling out of the upper frame edge and pushing in the lower half to get a straight line on the edge.


This seam had broken away so needs to be fixed. Noticed the bottom doesn't line up any more either.


The guard needed to be knocked down to get it aligned at the bottom.


The whole seam this time was fully welded rather than just a few spot welds the factory had.


Dressed up.


The flapping about had caused yet another fatigue crack behind one already welded up. Was better to cut it away and make a new patch instead of just welding the crack.


Putting some compound curve in the patch by hammering over a steam pipe bend.


The flange width will be added below this line.


Starting to hammer over the flange.


All welded in. I also had to fix up a small crack on both sides where the inner guard meets the triangular piece under the bonnet. Always pays to go searching to see if the movement over time has caused any other damage.


Other seam also welded and old drill holes on both guards done also.
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  #16  
Old 23-11-2017
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Originally the other place was going to weld these lengths of angle around the hole to stiffen it up. Would take some time in the shrinker stretcher to get them all to match perfectly. Then would have around 4 metres-13' of welding to fit them. Then grind, planish, sand, planish and run the strip disc over it and check for any distortion once again! Many many hours of work.


Thought I would check to see if the hole was an even distance all the way around like Christos had asked for. Not even close with even one side having over 15mm-9/16" difference from one end to the other!


So took the shortest length and made that the same all the way around marking every couple of inches. Radius corner template a lid from my zip ties.


Cut the long lengths with a 1mm cut off disc and did the corners with my jigsaw.


Pieces that needed to be cutout to make the distance even all the way around.


I got some 13mm-1/2" bar stock and cut down to the depth I wanted to tip the flange. Just used a 1mm cutoff disc and taped where I wanted to stop, 14mm-9/16".


Makes a good way to scribe a bending line to follow later too.


Slide the bar all the way in and bend down bit by bit. Actually found you could hold the same angle down and just knock the bar along and it would bend it down as you went along. Tape gives a good visual to make sure you are all the way in.


Corners are done the same way.


Once a couple of times around I switched to using my flanging pliers to speed things up along the straighter lengths. Bar was still used in the corners and kept at the same level of bend.


Probably took 6-7 times bending a little more getting the 90* bend.


As you see it now only the bar and the flanging pliers have been used.


Was pretty close already but some fine tuning to even any highs or lows. With this dolly behind the flange, I hammered on dolly, stretching the metal, near the bend if I wanted to raise it. Hammered on dolly only at the bottom of the flange if I wanted to lower it some.


One nice and stiff roof panel ready for an insert later on that will be removeable.


The insert can bolt through the newly made flanges with T type rubber seal in between.
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